Meet Kathryn Vaughan - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Unveiling, symbol-heavy, empathetic, umami, internal, psychological, feminine

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

My biggest piece of advice to my younger self is to trust myself in the process, and understand that many people are going to classify “what you do” as the thing you do to make money, versus what you do as your professional occupation of having an art-making practice.  We call it the “day job.”  Don’t feel like you need to explain yourself.  The most important thing is that you make good work.  There is no strait line forward in this career, and explaining  or quantifying my progress to others is much less simple than it is for those who have larger entities to facilitate the path through a career.  But the trade off is that you are running your own business, which means that you are your own boss.  

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What are you listening to at the moment?

On repeat I have the compilation album Welcome to Zamrock: How Zambia’s Liberation Led to a Rock Revolution...also listening to the Violent Femmes.. and The Score by Fugees.

What do you look at for inspiration?

People, food, object placement, around me, the shapes of overlapping leaves, other people’s paintings, my inner world.

What artists inspire you most?

Vincent Van Gogh, Willem De Kooning, Romare Bearden, Kerry James Marshall, Hope Gangloff, Jackie Gendel, Alice Neel, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Kiki Smith, Edward Munch, Katherine Kollowitz, Dana Schutz, Fairfield Porter 

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

One day...with my musician partner Dan Bogan

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

Never stop making work!! Have your artist support system! 

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

I applied as a resident because I wanted to start a new body of work focused on the act of painting people.  I wanted a space to take a fresh approach to my work, which also entails working in a minimal set up. I have only what I need and it’s so refreshing!  I’m getting everything I wanted from this residency!!

Kathryn Vaughan
https://www.kathrynvaughan.work/








Meet Kelly Kuykendall - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Playful, nostalgic, assemblage, happenstance  

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Looking back as a practicing artist as an adult, I would tell my younger self to just be more confident in order to make your dreams become a reality!

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What are you listening to at the moment?

I’ve been listening to Joe Frank, Beat Happening and a bunch of history podcasts.

What do you look at for inspiration?
It’s not very romantic, but I often have a TV show playing in the background while I’m in the studio. Something that doesn’t require a lot of my attention but when I do look up I enjoy looking at the prop styling and wardrobe. These kind of faux or idealized environments. I also look to how people organize their own spaces (maybe because my workspace is rarely organized).  I find other people’s homes inspirational. They can tell you so much about someone! What they value/cherish/take pride 

What artists inspire you most?

Currently I’m looking a lot at Katie Stout and Becky Suss.

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

Either of the two artists I just mentioned!

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

Learning when to say no to too many side gigs and make time for myself. 

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

The Jasper Studios residency is really flexible. This is important!! I have a couple of jobs and a schedule that tends to fluctuate, so having 24/7 access to a space is really nice! I’m hoping to get a couple of projects done.  A fabric book and a few prints. The book is almost complete and I’m going to start carving the blocks for the prints this week! I also started working on some digital collages that I am really excited about. I don’t think they would have been possible without access to this space. 

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Meet Morgan Nitz - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Humorous, gestural, narrative, stormy, crowded, camouflaged, and fluid.

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Work first, reflect later, and read more. Starting is what’s paralyzing. I thought ideas preceded art, but it’s an ebb and flow. Sometimes it all comes together in the middle of an unrelated conversation. Stay curious and write about your work often. Apply to everything that is free to apply to. It gives you a deadline to work towards, and afterwards you have an artist statement, a portfolio, a resume, all ready to send to the next art call that’s posted. Try (although it can be hard) to see opportunities, not challenges. I’m still learning these lessons.

What are you listening to at the moment?

Always Sufjan Stevens and Fiona Apple, my friends when I feel down or in my head. But also, my friend and fellow artist Taylor Rudolph put me on to Philly’s own Tierra Whack. And Anderson Paak is a great love of mine. <3

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What do you look at for inspiration?
Poetry, scientific phenomena, music, literature, gay stuff. In my conceptual practice I like to reflect on the intersection of personal narratives and cultural relationships to mythology, science, and psychology. In my recent paintings, I position myself within abstracted landscapes that are a little odd, a little funny.

What artists inspire you most?

I work for philly Artblog, (theartblog.org) so I’m constantly reading reviews of local artists. Lately, since I’ve been painting, I’ve learned from Stephen W. Evans and Mark Thomas Gibson, local artists that I discovered while reading/ working for Artblog. My friend Gillian Mead (https://gillianmeadart.com/) taught me most of what I know about painting. I have my list of superstars tucked away, but I care the most about artists living and working in Philly.

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

I collaborate all of the time! More so on projects than pieces. It’s important for me to be surrounded by like-minded, energized people. Philly is the perfect environment for collaboration. But hypothetically, probably Hito Steyerl. I heard her speak earlier this year at Moore. CT Jasper, my generous and huge-hearted former professor, constantly references her work in his classes.

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

To not worry about making work that is original; it’s nearly impossible. It was liberating to realize that I was allowed to reference, and it ended up grounding my work in the tangible. I started doing research and making commentary. My peers became more receptive to my work, and I became more passionate about it.

Post- graduation: becoming organized and integrating studio time into your schedule. Right out of school, you have all of this theoretical and conceptual training under your belt, but no more deadlines. It feels like every piece you start is the first piece of your career; it feels impossible to finish anything. I’ve been painting during this residency, which is abnormal for me. I studied Sculpture. But it’s gotten me back into the schedule of working regularly! I have momentum!

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

I was working in a tiny room in my apartment that’s basically my closet. I would come home from work and stare at my paints, then at my electronic marimba (which is an amazing piece of technology) and then my laptop…. each felt like a career path. Should I be painting? Should I be recording music? Should I be writing poetry? Editing video? Meanwhile, I’m sitting on my bed just exhausted, knowing I needed to do laundry, eat, grocery shop. I needed a space that was just for art. Where I could go and be surrounded by nothing but materials and space. Jasper Studios gave me that. So thank you! Everyone should apply to this residency!

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artist name
https://www.morgannitz.com/
@sonofm.a.n



Meet Katie Knoeringer - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less?

Simplified colorful worlds that celebrate visual experience. 

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Don't worry about the end result. Just keep making what you love and stay focused.

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What are you listening to at the moment?

Dan Deacon,  the Shivers, and storytelling podcasts like Heavyweight and Snap Judgement 

What do you look at for inspiration?
The neighborhood.  I run and bike around a lot. Certain times of day and certain landmarks on my runs inspire me.

What artists inspire you most?

Kerry James Marshall,  the French illustrator Blex Bolex, Henri Matisse, Pierre Bonnard, Suzanne Bocanegra-- I saw her show at Fabric Workshop recently. 

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

Maybe Swoon since she has made work in and about Philadelphia.  Her work has a lot to do with people, and although I don't incorporate portraits into my work, I think about people a lot.  Houses can stand in for people, a metaphor for the body and the head, not to mention their specific appearance reflecting on  their inhabitants choices and lifestyles. 

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

Trusting my instincts and not relying too heavily on other people's opinions.  Feedback is important, but ultimately my work is my own.

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

I applied because I like looking at things in the neighborhood.  Being at Jasper Studios gives me the opportunity to get to know a new part of Kensington.  It gives me room to think and a fresh frame of reference for the work I'm making.  I hope to make several large scale collages about the buildings in the neighborhood and striking visual moments I discover during my time at Jasper.

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Katie Knoeringer
http://www.katieknoeringer.com/
@regnireonk
























Meet Jermaine Ollivierre - Artist in Residence

Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Fearless, sincere, malleable, resilient, ephemeral, stubborn, and necessary.

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

Failure is inevitable, but so is your rise; keep moving forward and trust your intuition.

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What are you listening to at the moment?

The playlist ranges from Marvin Gaye’s Trouble Man to 90’s Trap Music, but currently, I’m listening to Jay-Z’s Smile, King Los’s, Ghetto Boys, and Meek Mill’s, What’s Free.

What do you look at for inspiration?
I draw my strength and inspiration from family.  Obstacles faced and maneuvered, my failures and how I remained persistent with an even more persistent support system.  I’ve learned so much from family, through all adversity, disenfranchised, and exhausted we still prevail; and I try to evoke those qualities in my work.

What artists inspire you most?

Karyn Olivier, Destiny Palmer, and Kara Springer have been major influences in how I approach material, and how I’m thinking about the subject matter.  Experiencing each artist's work has affected me in a positive way and continues to motivate me in my practice. The genius of their work is something I strive for indefinitely.

Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

I look forward to working with Theater Gates, how he’s thinking about art making, blurring practical and theoretical lines fascinates me and empowers me to create work that challenges systems in society.

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

Work ethic and time management is something I learned from my Professors (Bertha Gutman, and Jaime Brett Treadwell) at Delaware County Community College.  Dedicating time to focus on ideas and working religiously on those ideas have expedited my development as an artist.

Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

Jasper Studios has given vital support to many emerging artists in the Philadelphia area, and are genuinely interested in the success of the artist.

Exploring molasses and trying to change the material has been a humbling experience; realizing my forceful approach was flawed.  The opportunity arose from the 'molasses dilemma', and instead of willing the material I’ve learned to collaborate with it.

Jermaine Ollivierre
@jollivierre

Meet Marisa Keris - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Emotional, romantic, atmospheric, psychological, layered, figurative, earthy.

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

I’d tell myself to just keep moving forward, keep creating, and to get out of my own way. In the past I have spent too much time worrying about what to make, and some things you just have to work through to find your way. Painting is especially discovered and uncovered by “just doing it”. You have the rest of the painting’s life to analyze and critique it.

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What are you listening to at the moment?

Charles Bradley, Bonnie Raitt, Ryan Adams, a few Philly and Muscle Shoals soul standards– all the moody stuff.

What do you look at for inspiration?

Colors that come from nature, but also the unexpected discoveries that come from being outdoors. Time spent traveling, lots of walking, and looking at the ordinary until it’s seen in a new light. Beautiful little moments in real life that are like little paintings.

What artists inspire you most?

Giorgio Morandi, Antonio López García, Kaye Donachie, Cecily Brown, Balthus, Hanneline Rogeberg, Lisa Yuskavage.

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

William Kentridge has used drawing to crossover into opera, tapestry, animation, and public art– the man’s a master. I think it’s Kentridge’s devotion to drawing that all else unfolds. I wish I could have been part of the group that helped to create Triumphs and Laments, the power washed and stenciled mural created in 2016 along the Tiber River in Rome. It’s so specific to the place and was beautifully executed.

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

 My foundational training from the Rhode Island School of Design continues to make me a better artist and observer. Work ethic, technique, a deep love of drawing from nature, and rigorous color theory, are the base for everything I’m making today. I also see how it’s shaping my approach to teaching. I’m always trying to question, learn, improve, and grow.

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

After graduating from Tyler School of Art with my MFA in Painting I took a few months working outside a studio. I was craving a private space to paint, meet other artists, and show my work. I’m inspired by Philadelphia, its history, diversity and landscape. I’ve been attracted to Philadelphia for a long time, and Jasper Studios’ reuse of a beautiful old space makes that dream accessible to artists. I’m very influenced by my environment, and as a painter I’m enjoying the process of working in this studio to discover new work.

Marisa Keris
WWW.MARISA-KERIS.SQUARESPACE.COM/
@marisa_keris

Meet Chloe Pinero - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

intuitive, playful, queer, figurative, tactile, dense

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

It’s hard to say because I still feel like I am in the beginning of my career. I think I would tell myself to research and find more contemporary artists that can inspire and challenge me. Also to have confidence in the work that I am making and not to rely on others for affirmation.

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What are you listening to at the moment?

Kali Uchis, SZA, Princess Nokia and Tierra Whack have been on repeat for the past few weeks. All of these artists inspire me for many reasons. It’s exciting to see so many women in music really doing their thing, and it’s especially inspiring to get to hear another artistic voice from Philly (Tierra Whack). These musicians deal with some of the same things in their music that I deal with in my work, so listening to them can be a way for me to tap into some of the themes in my work but also motivation in the studio.  

What do you look at for inspiration?

Growing up and living in Philadelphia and coming from a Puerto Rican household has influenced my process and material choices in my work. If you look around Philly you’ll notice that so much of the environment is physically layered and responding to the architecture or objects that were previously there. I see my process of collage as a way of layering material and visual information to create a conceptual space relating to ideas of queerness and place. I also look to other artists whose work is similar to mine and spend a lot of time researching. Going out to shows and First Friday exhibitions always gets me inspired and motivated.

What artists inspire you most?

Mickalene Thomas and Kerry James Marshall are forever my top. But right now I am looking at Kenny Rivero, Jonathan Lyndon Chase, Pat Phillips, Troy Michie, and Cheyenne Julien.

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Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

I would be overwhelmed with excitement to meet or work with any of the artists I listed above. The dream would be to have a show with any of them.

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

To keep making work despite everything. As an artist there are so many moments where you feel stuck because you are overwhelmed by possibility or where you really don't know what the next thing is. If you just keep making work, things piece themselves together, and you will get to an open door. Be patient with yourself because you are not a machine. Also I think it is important to write about your work and to stick with a community of people or artists who you can talk to about your work.

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Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

I applied to become a resident at Jasper Studios because I had just graduated undergrad and needed a space to keep making work. Jasper Studios has given me a space where I can work large and pursue the same concepts and processes which I was working on towards the end of my undergraduate education. While at Jasper my goal was to make a body of work that really pushed the tactile/sculptural quality of my paintings, while still exploring themes of queerness, gender, landscape, and material culture in America and Puerto Rico.

CHLOE PINERO
WWW.CHLOEPINERO.COM
@CHLOEPINERO

Meet Joseph Lozano - Artist in Residence

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Can you describe your work for us in 7 words or less

Now then, then again, now and again.

Being an artist can be a challenging profession, what advice would you give to your younger self?

I would tell myself that relationships are one of the most valuable assets to your career. Get out of the studio more and invest your time building strong relationships with other artists. They will sharpen you as an artist and most opportunities that come your way will come from them. Your paintings will still be there when you get back.

What are you listening to at the moment?

Let’s see, the last five albums I listened to are Bill Callahan - Apocalypse, Nick Cave – Skeleton Tree, Marnie Stern – Marnie Stern, Run the Jewels - 3, Boards of Canada – Music has the Right to Children

What do you look at for inspiration?

I have been watching my three year old son draw. He has no habits yet, so each mark is a revelation.

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What artists inspire you most?

The artists that inspire me the most are the ones that are close to me, by proximity or by friendship. You get the most out of art works that you watch develop and invest thought into, over time. Michael Ciervo, Anna Neighbor, Anthony Bowers, Mariel Capanna and Aubrey Levinthal are a few Philly artists that inspire me.

Who would be a dream artist to collaborate with?

I would have liked to go for a walk with Bas Jan Ader.

What’s something that you learned early in your career that you feel made you a better artist?

Art has always been my passion, but it took me a few years to pursuit it intentionally. Once I got to art school I resolved to work harder and put in more hours than anyone else. This was hard to do because a handful of my classmates had the same resolve. I would paint and draw all day in class, then I would stay and paint still lives and draw casts all night. Today, I have a full time day job, I teach part time, and I have two young sons (Hugo and Wills) at home. The work ethic developed then has carried me through the years since and drives me into the studio even when I am exhausted. Inspiration doesn’t just come to me. I create inspiration through the work.

Why did you apply to become a resident at Jasper Studios? And what did you hope to achieve during the residency program?

My family is my first commitment. Between raising my boys with my wife and the jobs I work to support them, I don’t have the time or flexibility to pursue a traditional residency. When I saw this opportunity come up, to have a residency right here at home, I jumped at it. It’s been almost ten years since I had a studio that wasn’t a second bedroom, so having dedicated time and space to work in this beautiful building has been amazing. It can be tough to focus when your studio shares a wall with a baby’s room. The timing couldn’t have been more perfect either, as I am working towards two solo shows scheduled for this winter at Gross McCleaf gallery and Abington Art Center.

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JOSEPH LOZANO
WWW.JOSEPHPLOZANO.COM
@JOSEPHPLOZANO

Summer 2018 Artist Residency Winners

We are excited to welcome our newest artists in residence to the Jasper Studios Artist Residency Program, Joseph Lozano and Chloe Pinero! Every three months, artists in Philadelphia are welcomed to apply to the artist residency program. Artists that are chosen will receive a work studio space among an existing community of over 50 artists and entrepreneurs. 

 

JOSEPH LOZANO
WWW.JOSEPHPLOZANO.COM
@JOSEPHPLOZANO

Dropping four balls on the floor to get a square  48" x 48", oil on linen laid on panel

Dropping four balls on the floor to get a square
48" x 48", oil on linen laid on panel

Shelves III -  54" x 54", oil on canvas

Shelves III - 54" x 54", oil on canvas


CHLOE PINERO
WWW.CHLOEPINERO.COM
@CHLOEPINERO

Visual artist Chloe Piñero at Tyler School of Art has vibrant, eye-catching collages & paintings are creating lots of buzz in the art world. Piñero is quickly becoming a standout talent of the Puerto Rican diaspora . Pinero, who spent her junior year studying art in Rome, mostly produces oil paintings and collages, but also pursues interests in sculpture and photography. Her work explores “ideas of identity, community, and place.” She explains, “My experiences growing up in a city have fueled my interest in portraiture, texture, and collage … I have been making collages, which help me understand myself in relation to constructs of sexuality, gender, and power within Puerto Rican culture.”

Hard to See (Juicy)  Paper, fabric, tarp, enamel, charcoal, oil paint, linoleum tile, on paper  30”x48”

Hard to See (Juicy)

Paper, fabric, tarp, enamel, charcoal, oil paint, linoleum tile, on paper

30”x48”

Play Until You Win  Spray paint, crayon, pastel, fabric, and paper on cardboard  36”x40”

Play Until You Win

Spray paint, crayon, pastel, fabric, and paper on cardboard

36”x40”